Cannabis Following A Stroke

Cannabis Following A Stroke
12” x 19” Heavy Weight Archival Paper
by
Jennifer Weihmann

Jennifer Weihmann

Jennifer Weihmann is an artist, largely self-taught as a photographer with a strong background in sculpture. Originating in rural Alberta, Jennifer started her studio experience before formally entering the Faculty of Fine Arts at Grande Prairie Regional College. Furthering her education in Communications, Visual Studies & Art History, Jennifer completed her studies at the Department of Communication, Media & Film, University of Calgary. 

Jennifer is a collector and compulsively gathers organic objects from the natural environments she visits and uses these artifacts as the subject matter for many of her photographs. She is best known as an abstract landscape and nature photographer, and generally does not photograph large scale landscapes. Instead she intimately immerses herself amongst the flora focusing on minimizing context and often leaving scale open for interpretation. This dual meditation of macro and micro invites viewers to consider their place in the natural world as these glimpses of rare transient moments illustrate the fragile and temporary nature of the world and our relationship to it. People often refer to her photographs as paintings—her favourite compliment. 

Jennifer also has a large body of work documenting the lives of people—from musicians to the communities she resides in such as the Sunnyhill Housing Cooperative. She also photographed groups of adults, with whom she embedded herself, living on the streets of Houston TX, and in Calgary AB, in 2005.

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Artwork Inspiration

Claire Niehaus is currently researching the Effects of Cannabis on Neuroinflammation and Stroke Recovery. In my photograph I tried to illustrate plant-based pharmaceuticals by using natural objects: poplar tree leaves and the Northern Bedstraw plant (coincidentally, Bedstraw plants were used to make hot compresses to stop bleeding and soothe sore muscles). The leafminer trails on the leaves resemble the physical appearance

of the human brain while the Bedstraw shadows bear a resemblance to individual neurons and synapses. I created a double exposure image by strategically layering two photographs illustrating leafminer markings and the shadows cast from a Bedshaw plant. Double exposure images are relatively new for me, simply because I greatly prefer creating dynamic single exposure images. However, Claire is fascinated by research, and I thought it a perfect time to research and explore the process of digital double exposure photography. The final piece successfully exemplifies my visual interpretation of Claire’s research by only featuring organic plant-based materials and relying on the beautiful detailed consequences of nature’s processes. The configurations featured in the image symbolically illustrate inflammation, neural activity, and the structure of a human brain —together creating a metaphorical map, one which curious minds may follow, scientists and artists alike.

Claire Niehaus

Claire Niehaus

Masters Student, University of Lethbridge
Helping Hands: Exploring the Effects of Cannabis on Neuroinflammation and Stroke Recovery
Read more about this research